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Explain Superman’s Flying Hair To Me

It’s Sunday night in the middle of an extended holiday weekend, and so I realize that this is the time for frivolous questions, not for weighty debates. So, instead of opening up a general thread of discussion with a poser of deep political philosophy, tonight I just want someone to explain to me this:

My hair gets messed up just when I roll down the car window, so how come, when Superman goes flying at supersonic speeds, his hair never gets messed up?

4 comments to Explain Superman’s Flying Hair To Me

  • Sarge

    Ah, yes, I guess he uses “super” mousse? A very good SF story/essay by Larry Niven, “Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex” about the actual love life of Superman. I laughed my patoot off.

  • HareTrinity

    Superhair!

  • Superman is surrounded by an invisible aura which protects his suit from damage when flying at superspeed and when hit by bullets. That aura naturally extends to his hair, which doesn’t get mussed up by the airstream…
    Dang! I need to get out more!

  • Frank Mullen III

    At least on television, Superman did _not_ travel at supersonic speed. Kids who lived near military air bases, where in the 50s knew the sound of test pilots breaking the sound barrier in experimental craft: a sudden, deep thud that shook the building.

    You never heard that sound on TV when Superman flew. And unlike the way he was sometimes depicted in the comics, he always flew with his arms straight out in front of him, hands open as he sliced his way through the sky above Metropolis.

    This explains why Superman’s hair remained unruffled. Consider this: why does a diver assume that same position when diving into water? To diffuse the force of the water, to prevent a sudden jolt against face or head.

    Similarly, Superman’s arms and hands diffuse the force the air, pushing it away and minimizing air turbulence around his head.

    Next question?

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