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Baby Doll T, RIP

Baby Doll T-Shirt Tombstone : RIP, CafePressTomorrow, CafePress is automatically replacing its American Apparel “Baby Doll” style t-shirt — a product made in the USA with a transparent record on workers’ rights and compensations — with a CafePress Exclusive Label brand Jersey style t-shirt. This new CafePress-branded shirt has no reported sourcing. Despite multiple requests, CafePress has failed to disclose under what conditions, or from which factories, or even from what countries, this shirt will be hailing from. Any guesses as to why CafePress has failed to tell us where these new shirts are coming from?

Because CafePress has failed to make disclosures regarding this new shirt, the ethics of offering it for sale are dubious at best. So rather than permit CafePress to automatically switch the ethical offerings of our online shops to this new questionable item, we’ll pre-emptively delete them from our shops. Look for these to disappear starting tonight.

Fortunately, ethically clear choices are still available at our CafePress shops. Organic, Fitted, Hoodie, Raglan, Tank Top and even Dog t-shirts all made ethically by American Apparel are still available in our shops. But this item, thanks to a lack of commitment and an avoidance of transparency by CafePress, is biting the dust.

2 comments to Baby Doll T, RIP

  • Adam Bradley

    OK, admittedly maintaining a “sexually-charged workplace” (resulting in three sexual harassment suits and an advertising portfolio that looks like amateur porn) is much less severe corporate misbehavior than sweatshop ownership, but I still don’t think AA qualifies as exactly “ethically clear.”

    And even if you’re so hip and post-feminist that the objectification of women doesn’t matter to you, AA’s alleged unionbusting activities place it into at least the “ethically-murky” category.

    Don’t pat yourselves on the back just yet.

  • Jim

    These are branded as sexy clothes. People buy them as sexy clothes. They’re modeled as sexy clothes. I could get into discussions with you about that, and there are aspects of it that I think are bizarre, and I won’t speak for other people at Irregular Times, but yeah, if I have to make a choice between someone getting paid pennies an hour to make a shirt and a company that has a catalog in which sexy clothes are advertised as sexy clothes, I choose the latter.

    The more substantively interesting issues you’re talking about are three sexual harassment suits and the (as you put it) “alleged unionbusting.” The “alleged unionbusting” is an incident from 2003, and I believe the sexual harassment issues go back to 2004-2005, correct?

    Both the “alleged unionbusting” and the sexual harassment suits revolved around the personality of Dov Charney when he owned American Apparel. Dov Charney no longer owns American Apparel, from what I’ve read in the papers.

    No, American Apparel is not perfect. It has a history of being owned by an egomaniacal asshole who was overfond of his own penis, and it had an incident of friction with a union four years ago long before it was sold out from under the Big Dick. But that’s not, unless I am unaware of something, what American Apparel is now. If there is something current I should be aware of, please shoot off a link to something I can read.

    When I weigh the personal behavior of one prick against what has been the transparent structure of the entire corporation, yes, I do place it well above other shirt producers. I prioritize the compensation and benefits package that lies hugely above those of Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, Anvil etc. workers very, very strongly.

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