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Deborah Honeycutt Incoherent On Health Care

Mother Davis feels a strange tickle in her chest as she looks for an MD and finds instead,

Republican Deborah Honeycutt is running for Congress on the basis of her experience as a medical doctor. However, when she looks at America’s sick health care, her remedy is to provide no treatment at all.

Describing her notion of what needs to be done to deal with the problems of America’s health care system, Honeycutt suggests that we just take a hands-off approach, and wait for things to get better on their own. She writes,

In America a government sponsored one size fits all solution won’t fit anyone. We can develop a number of health care solutions through free-market, multi group efforts that allow government to do its part and citizens to do their part. There are ways to help those who are uninsured to be qualified through existing programs… When I was setting up my own private practice, I was doing my best to help people. I was not able to serve the people most in need because of all the government restrictions. People need assistance and empowerment to help themselves, not to be helpless. They remain helpless because they never get the assistance that allows them to be out of that situation.”

I am truly confused by this statement on health care policy. What kind of “government restrictions” prevent physicians from helping people who lack the money to pay for adequate health care? Is there a government regulation that forbids physicians to help people pay for medical treatment?

How does Honeycutt suggest that people whose problem is that they can’t help themselves, could be helped to help themselves? How would Honeycutt apply this strange idea of helping people to not need help any more?

The center of Honeycutt’s health care plan seems to be to rely on free market solutions. That position may satisfy right wing ideology, but it doesn’t make any practical sense. The private marketplace in health care is rapidly deteriorating. Because of its close connection to the labor market, which is in turn connected to Wall Street markets, private health care plans have been growing weaker at the same time that they’ve been growing more expensive. Thanks to the free market reign over health care in the USA, employers and employees alike are paying more for health care, and getting less for what they pay.

The free market has been a disaster for health care. If Deborah Honeycutt hasn’t noticed that, what else has escaped her attention? How about the financial crisis that’s become the most important campaign issue this year? Honeycutt doesn’t bother to include it on her list of central issues for her campaign.

On issues like health care and the economy, Deborah Honeycutt seems stuck with an outdated Republican script that leaves her unable to adapt to the real, changing needs of the American nation. She’s like medical doctor who, instead of actually examining her patients, offers general theories about their health, and then moves on without prescribing any treatment.

Coughing up a piece of stubborn phlegm,
Mother Davis

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