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Mocking the Perfect Rock Wall in Maine

Jim Krosschell writes with grace and wit about living in and living with the Midcoast region of Maine, joining and gently mocking its intense debate about the future placement of a Dunkin’ Donuts. My favorite article of his concerns the varying appearance of the old rock wall, settling on one wall in particular located on a well-to-do coastal peninsula:

a Rock Wall in RockportWhen you happen upon them in the woods, they’re usually falling down and terribly picturesque, but of course they mean that the land at one time had been stripped of its trees and given over to muck and cow manure. That the trees have reclaimed the land is not an entirely perfect consolation. When you happen upon one in the suburbs, it usually means you’re in a rich part of town and a specialist has assembled it beautifully, from other stone walls, without mortar, with great historical accuracy, in front of the huge, California-style mansion on the knoll above. You don’t happen upon them at all on working farms – modern cows must be very athletic.

And then there’s this one, in Rockport, Maine.

It stretches for hundreds of yards along Calderwood Lane. There’s only one entrance. It’s unvaryingly uniform. Note the perfect toupee of moss along its top, and the dark green moss near the bottom to signify age, and the grass mowed on the outside. Undoubtedly, the mortar will preserve it for another hundred years. It won’t be allowed to fall down.

1 comment to Mocking the Perfect Rock Wall in Maine

  • That the trees have reclaimed the land in those wilder spots is not a perfect consolation, but I’ve found that life offers few instances of perfect consolation. These walls are quite adequate consolation for me, and are much better than the twee constructions in the hoity toity parts of town, or the plastic and plaster constructions near the Westfield Wherever malls.

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