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Emanuel Cleaver Complains About Complaining

Yesterday, U.S. Representative Emanuel Cleaver introduced H. Con. Res. 155, a resolution that begins with the complaint that, “Whereas the average person complains approximately 15 to 30 times per day, resulting in roughly 4,500,000,000 complaints spoken every day in the United States…”

emanuel cleaver complainingYes, it’s a resolution that supports the idea of a holiday called Complaint Free Wednesday. On this proposed holiday, everyone would try to stop complaining. But, the resolution itself begins with a complaint. Emanuel Cleaver introduced this resolution to complain about complaining.

The idea, I suppose, is that if people just stopped complaining, then they could go out into the world and actually accomplish something, instead of dwelling on negative thoughts. If Emanuel Cleaver is any measure, however, a complaint-free lifestyle is not the reliable path to accomplishment that H. Con. Res. 155 suggests it is. Emanuel Cleaver is not what you would call a high achiever in Congress. Cleaver has offered no substantive legislation this year, no positive solutions for the problems that most Americans deal with.

The three bits of legislation that Cleaver has introduced to the current session of Congress are:

1. His complaint about complaining
2. A bill to create a commission to talk about preparing a centennial memorial event in Missouri
3. A bill to ensure that insurers of tax-exempt municipal bonds are able to get reinsurance

Maybe the reason Emanuel Clever is introducing his resolution to complain about complaining is that he’s tired of his constituents calling his office to complain that he’s not doing a good job of representing them in Congress.

12 comments to Emanuel Cleaver Complains About Complaining

  • Tom

    As if we need any more examples of the giant waste of time we call Congress, this guy comes along. With all that’s wrong with our government and too many of its policies he’s worried about complaints?
    Please.

    • Oh, now don’t complain, Tom. Actually, complaining is at the heart of our democracy – one form being the freedom to petition the government for redress of grievances.

      But, it’s not Congress the institution that’s a waste. It’s most of the people who are in it now that are the problem.

    • qs

      I second that. Our congress is a blood parasite to be gotten rid of.

  • So, you don’t want a representative legislative assembly any more? Let’s be clear in what we say. Congress is not the problem. The representatives we have in Congress are the problem. The solution to the problem is not to destroy Congress, but to pay attention to what our particular members of Congress are up to, and work to elect more effective and ethical replacements.

  • Jacob

    I think that since aCongress person is supposed to be a representative of the public there should be more interaction. Currently we vote for them and they go do whatever they want. It doesnt really seem like they vote according to the population they reprsent. I think that there should either a mail program or internet voting program set up where they make us aware of all votes coming up and the public of that person weighs in on the matter. The Congress person would then be bound to vote in the way that the public dictates. I know that every person wouldnt participate but my theory is if you dont speak up then you dont count…

    • As a matter of fact, I’m about to write about a piece of legislation, H. Res. 554, that sets up a requirement that we be allowed some time to read a bill before it’s passed. It’s not an Internet voting system, but it does at least guarantee information so that we can speak to our representatives with knowledge of upcoming votes.

      • Anonymous

        I see “I’m about to write about a piece of legislation” and am very curious how that works. Are you an elected official or can normal folks right bills and send them in?

        • No, I’m writing ABOUT it. Like I can write ABOUT the planet Mars, or my neighbor’s dog. Article written now, by the way.

          • Jacob

            Sorry, misread. My respect level was going to go through the roof if you had written legeslation as a normal non elected person and where trying to get someone to grab ahold and run with it…

  • Jacob

    sorry, above is from me. Name didnt populate

  • CuriousG

    If everyone loved their neighbor as themselves we would not have this issue. I guess the greatest commandment of all is hard to follow.

  • CuriousG

    Good idea though!

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