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Is Peace Day Only In The Little Things?

Today is Peace Day, or, if you want to get formal about it, the International Day of Peace. In order to commemorate this holiday, the United States Senate unanimously passed a resolution last week, S. Res. 274, supporting the celebration of Peace Day.

I’m glad that the Senate passed that resolution. It contains a nice sentiment. However, when it comes to the kind of action that really counts, most of the current members of the United States Senate have also voted many times against peace. They’ve voted in support of sending the United States into war. They’ve voted to keep on funding our nation’s nuclear weapons program. They’ve voted in favor of George W. Bush’s and Barack Obama’s record-breaking military budgets. They’ve voted to continue to send terrible weapons such as cluster bombs to foreign countries where they’re used against civilian populations.

The Senate Peace Day resolution avoids mentioning the need to put an end to these large scale sorts of anti-peace activities. Instead, the Senate resolution celebrates little things happening in faraway places, things like:

– Providing mosquito nets in a province of the Republic of Congo
– Painting school buildings in Afghanistan
– A program to encourage peace through international soccer games

Don’t misunderstand me – these things are really nice. We need more programs like these.

However, there’s no way that a mosquito net is going to stop a bullet. No soccer game can withstand a bomb dropped from above by a foreign air force. It doesn’t matter whether school buildings are painted or not if the communities in which they are build are targeted by nuclear missiles.

The members of the United States Senate have much more power at their disposal than what they exercised through S. Res. 274. They have the power to stop shipping weapons overseas. They have the power to bring American soldiers back home. They have the power to reduce the ever-increasing U.S. military budget, by far the largest military budget in the world.

Given that power, a toothless resolution praising Peace Day just doesn’t cut it.

3 comments to Is Peace Day Only In The Little Things?

  • Tom

    You don’t really believe that any of our representatives or senators would pass up a spot on the gravy train, do you? C’mon, don’t be naive. Follow the money, man! It’s all about wars over there to kill meaningless brown people so that our military-industrial corporations can stay strong through this (er, ahem) ‘recession’, don’t ya know.

    Otherwise, PEACE BABY!!

  • qs

    Peregrin Wood,

    Are you ready for another WMD without evidence war? (can you imagine two of them in a row?)

    Obama’s Hell-Ride to War on Iran

    Faced with the uncomfortable and politically unacceptable reality that there exists no evidence that Iran is pursuing a nuclear weapon, confirmed by his own intelligence community, President Obama has taken a page from the book of his predecessors FDR, LBJ, GWB, and so on: he simply made something really scary-sounding up to justify his push toward war.
    This time it is the artificially manufactured hype around an Iranian uranium enrichment facility that is under construction. Keep in mind that as a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Iran, under Article IV of said treaty, has every right to enrich uranium to its heart’s content. The treaty clearly states: “Nothing in this Treaty shall be interpreted as affecting the inalienable right of all the Parties to the Treaty to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes without discrimination and in conformity with Articles I and II of this Treaty.”

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