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Links for Trees

For the second day in a row, I’m trying to work while listening to the sound of chainsaws and a wood chipping machine. New neighbors just moved in across the street, and the first big thing they’re doing is cutting down a huge amount of trees on the property. Young and old trees alike are being hauled down and chopped to bits.

The house across the street is perched on the edge of a 15-foot cliff next to a creek that roars with meltoff in the springtime. It’s a tall house with an old, thin foundation that’s built within the side of a gorge. Tree roots have helped to hold the slope together, and they will for a while longer, until they start to decompose. Then, the sunny soil will wash away, bit by bit, whenever it rains.

There’s the bigger problem of climate change as well. Global warming continues, despite hype intended to distract from the problem. Last month was the warmest March on record.

My children have been watching the destruction from the front porch, and they’ve asked me to do something to stop it. I have to tell them that I can’t stop them. Being neighborly means not saying anything when somebody does something legal-but-ugly. Besides, property rights trump the collective sense of our community’s value. We’ll have to look out at a bare, sun-bleached plot of wreckage.

So, what can we do? We can plant yet another tree on our own property, and we can support others who are working to plant trees elsewhere. Look at the following organizations if, like my family, you’re seeking to offset a neighbor’s anti-tree stupidity.

Alliance for Community Trees
Trees for the Future
Jewelry For Trees
Tree Link
Tree People
People for Trees
Tunes for Trees

6 comments to Links for Trees

  • Jacob

    Maybe they are going to plant new trees. It would be stupid but I have seen people do it. They dont like Oak treeks so they cut them down and plant Sycamores

    • Jacob

      The foul mouthed jacob posting today is not with me. Just wanted to make that clear.

      • Chucklenuts

        Oh yeah? Well @#$%&^*#^*&#*^# YOU! ;)

        And it’s not always stupid to cut down trees. We’ve had to remove several due to blight on them that may not be obvious when you look at them, but will eventually bring them down. It may make more sense to bite the bullet and get them out now and get an early start on the new growth. Probably not with most of these modern house builders, I agree.

        But there are plenty of good reasons to cut down and replant. That’s just one of them.

    • It would indeed be stupid for them to cut down these trees with the thought of planting new trees. Most of the trees they cut down were quite healthy maple trees, which have good, strong root systems with long lives, and they’re on a rather severe slope.

      • Chucklenuts

        It would be indeed quite stupid of me to generalize as you have done. However, I’ll be specific for you and reiterate that there are diseases that are not readily apparent. In the case of Maple trees sapstreak is a fungus that can be seen after you cut it down (which is really the only way to stop its spread) and will be seen in the wood in the lower trunk of the tree.

        If you’ve had the tree on your neighbor’s yard examined and checked for non-obvious blight, then you’re qualified to comment on this action. Otherwise, you are presuming that the trees are healthy, and that is speaking out of ignorance.

        I’m not saying that many people don’t make stupid decisions. However, maybe they simply don’t like maple trees and prefer something else. If they carefully manage the erosion on where they have removed them, it is perfectly safe and very practical to remove trees, relandscape, and avoid erosion problems. I have plenty of established trees on an extremely steep slope, and that does not preclude my erosion of the bank year after year, unless I take man-adjusted precautions.

        Nature does not automatically cure all erosion, or every other problem either. No does mankind cause them all.

  • New neighbors are doing the same thing here. It’s a shame.

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