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Mid Spring Garden Update

My latest gardening activities include planting a start of chocolate mint, placing young tomato plants in trenches hollowed out from leaf mulch filled with old compost, and replacing a small triangular patch of lawn with annual flowers. Those flowers will be replaced in turn with perennial herbs later on.

I’m also dawdling in placing some variegated ornamental grasses I was given a few weeks ago. The variegation makes them tricky for me conceptually, because it makes their planting look permanently deliberate, even after the spaces between the original plants fill in with runners.

What’s going on in your garden?

4 comments to Mid Spring Garden Update

  • Jim

    We’ve snacked on our first round of radishes; the second and third rounds are on their way. Our peas are about 4 inches up and we’ve got green bean and spearmint sprouts. We’ll get some carrots coming up next week, I hope. On the flower front we’ve mixed some sunflowers in with marigolds and black-eyed susans in a south-facing hillside bed. That should be a fun one. And the kicker is treedom: someone gave me a mountain ash tree for my birthday. It came bare-root, which I learned means that the tree is basically a stick, but it’s a stick with leaves, and in a few years it should be making the birds very happy. I transplanted an oak from a stand of woods to a grassy spot last year and I thought it was dead for sure, but now the leaves are coming out on it. An acorn I stuck in a pot is just pushing up past the top layer of dirt, and I’ve put three little maple seedlings in pots, too. I hope these all make it through the summer and find a good home by the fall, whether in our too-grassy yard or in someone else’s.

  • In the long term, make sure that you don’t grow sunflowers in the same spot year after year. They have substances that discourage the growth of other plants around them… in all parts of the plant, including seed husks, leaves, and roots.

    Don’t you have maple seedlings coming up all over the place? I sure do at my place.

  • Tom

    The large raised bed garden box i built in the back yard in March and filled with fresh screened mushroomsoil/topsoil mix now has 16 tomatoes of different varieties, 8 pepper plants (sweet to hot), and a few each of beans, squash, & cucumbers so far, with lots of room for more yet to be planted (i was late in germinating some other stuff). Looks good so far.

    The front flower bed has irises in full bloom (yellow, white and yellow, purple, and a “dusky” color variety), roses, phlox, sedum beds surrounding two large rocks in different places, a foxglove (i’ll plant more), marigolds, silver mound, galenia, calla lillies, salvia, hostas, elephant ears, alleum, a packet of four o’clocks (not up yet), white impatiens, cornflowers, tulips (done already), bellflowers, candlevines, shasta daisies, and a few others whose names i’ve forgotten.

  • Gosh, Tom. Aren’t you worried about a frost? It’s not Memorial Day yet! ;)

    The old gardening rules about when to plant appear to have flown away.

    Watch for those foxgloves to seed around… if you can recognize the leaf while they’re still young.

    Good work, Tom.

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