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Governments Request More User Data from Google in 2011. Which Countries are the Biggest Culprits?

Earlier this month, I shared with you a map showing results from Google’s report on the number of requests for user data from the governments of the world, current through December 2010:

Requests for User Data from Google, July to December 2010

Google has just updated its report to include a new six-month period, January to June of 2011. The most acquisitive governments of the world have increased their demands for user data from Google:

Requests to Google by World Governments to Surrender User Data, January to June 2011

But this map is an OK measure of volume, it isn’t the best way to figure out which governments are the most hungry for the personal data of their citizens subjects. To find the governments with the biggest inclination to pry, we need to control for the population size of each country:

User Data Requests per Million Population of a Country made of Google

The tooliest nations on Earth in regard to data on Google Users, controlling for population size, are Singapore, the United Kingdom, France, the United States and Hong Kong.

Funny thing: none of the the most snoopy nations are Soviet bloc countries. They’re major centers of world capitalism.

1 comment to Governments Request More User Data from Google in 2011. Which Countries are the Biggest Culprits?

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