Enter your email address to subscribe to Irregular Times and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 313 other subscribers

Irregular Times Newsletters

Click here to subscribe to any or all of our six topical e-mail newsletters:
  1. Social Movement Actions,
  2. Credulity and Faith,
  3. Election News,
  4. This Week in Congress,
  5. Tech Dispatch and
  6. our latest Political Stickers and Such

Contact Us

We can be contacted via retorts@irregulartimes.com

Roll Call: Who In Congress Defended Separation Of Church And State?

Two and a half years ago, the American Religious Identification Survey noted that religious belief is becoming much more diverse in the United States, and that the number of Americans who don’t consider themselves to be religious at all has been steadily growing.

So, an honest answer to the question “What do Americans trust in terms of religion?” would be twofold: 1) More Americans don’t trust religion than before; and 2) More Americans don’t trust the idea of God than before. The answer “In God We Trust” would not be honest or accurate.

Yet, just yesterday, that’s the answer that the U.S. Congress decided upon. The House of Representatives approved H. Con. Res. 13, a bill to declare that the national motto should belong to just one kind of religious belief: Theism, belief and trust in a deity called “God”.

Lots of Americans believe in this God and trust in it, and that’s okay. But, more and more Americans don’t believe in that God, or trust in the idea of such a deity. American government belongs to them, just as much as it belongs to the God-trusters. That’s what democracy, and freedom of religion, is all about.

Declaring for everybody that “In God We Trust” just isn’t respectful, and it doesn’t recognize the reality that the idea of God is simply irrelevant for millions of Americans.

Sadly, only nine members of Congress had the strength of character to reject an attempt to shove all Americans into the God Box. Only the following nine U.S. Representatives voted against H. Con. Res. 13. They deserve our thanks.

Rep. Gary Ackerman
Rep. Justin Amash
Rep. Judy Chu
Rep. Emanuel Cleaver
Rep. Michael Honda
Rep. Hank Johnson
Rep. Jerrold Nadler
Rep. Robert Scott
Rep. Pete Stark

7 comments to Roll Call: Who In Congress Defended Separation Of Church And State?

  • Tom

    What gets me is all these pompous, lying sacks of shit stand there and lie to us about what devout CHRISTIANS they are, then they make backroom deals to line their own pockets, ignore corporate pollution and Wall Street malfeasance at the expense of their constituents. If that’s their idea of Christianity i can see why people think the religion is passe (since these clowns don’t really act like Christ and with all the paedophilia issues the Church is dealing with it’s probably just a matter of time til the religion is a footnote in history).

  • JeffD

    Christianity a footnote in history? Now THAT’S funny.

    • Yeah, who could say that, when everyone knows that George W. Bush and Barack Obama have been using the Office of Faith-Based Initiatives to expand Christian political influence using the power of the federal government. Funny?

      With Obama’s help, Christian churches are taking in big government money, and offering their services as locations for presidential campaign events. With Obama’s help, Christianity is becoming bigger and more corrupt day by day.

      Yes, Tom is quite wrong about Christianity being a footnote. I can’t say that I really find it funny, though.

      • JeffD

        I do laugh at a lot of things others don’t. But I also don’t equate Christianity with “churches” nor “christian political influence”. Instead I was thinking of people who believe in Jesus Christ. The thought that anything will make that nothing more than a footnote in history after over 2000 years is quite funny to me.

  • OH

    Many, including the author, are missing a significant factor. Just because a person doesn’t embrace a religion, Christian or otherwise, doesn’t automatically mean they don’t believe in or have a strong affiliation with a ‘God’. Personal spirituality is becoming a stronger, more prevalent affilitaion every day, as people move away from the power-hungry, dictatorial ‘relitions’ of the world. God is personal to me, and not a part of any specific religion that attempts to control me.

  • OH

    Many, including the author, are missing a significant factor. Just because a person doesn’t embrace a religion, Christian or otherwise, doesn’t automatically mean they don’t believe in or have a strong affiliation with a ‘God’. Personal spirituality is becoming a stronger, more prevalent affilitaion every day, as people move away from the power-hungry, dictatorial ‘religions’ of the world. God is personal to me, and not a part of any specific religion that attempts to control me.

    • OH, I’ve cited a specific study. Do you have any data to back up your assertion that “personal spirituality is becoming a stronger, more prevalent affilitaion every day”, or is it something you just have a suspicion about?

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>