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The Definition of Environmentalism

For years, polluting corporations and corrupt politicians have worked to redefine the meaning of environmentalism. To serve their selfish interests, they’ve tried to convince people that environmentalists are crazy radicals.

tshirt for planet earthCrazy? Are environmentalists really crazy?

In response to the posturing of the public relations firms and their fat advertising budgets, I offer the following alternative definition of what it means to be an environmentalist.

Environmentalists:
Those crazy people who think that Planet Earth matters

I gladly admit that I’m that kind of crazy.

2 comments to The Definition of Environmentalism

  • Tom

    Yeah and thanks to the “leadership” (right off the cliff) of the big three, China, India and the U.S., the climate “talks” (as if it isn’t CRUCIAL to the survival of the planet) are going nowhere. So the citizenry suffer at the hands of the greedy industrialists who value profit and their positions of power to LIFE for many species of plant, fish, and animal INCLUDING HUMANS.

    Here, look what the Chinese population has to endure on any given day:
    http://thinkprogress.org/romm/2011/12/07/383619/china-carbon-chinese-impacts/

    In Japan, with its radiation and other environmental damage, life has gotten precarious – especially for children.

    In India, MOST of the population is in the lower chastes and suffering while the environment takes a beating (remember Bhopal?).

    Here, we all know it SEEMS a little better because of clean air and clean water laws, but they are being eroded due to lack of enforcement and things aren’t all that great environmentally speaking. Look into the Gulf (still not cleaned up, and probably can’t be), Alaska, the Everglades, the Great Lakes, New England, and California to get an idea of the erosion we’re not being told about on the news. Even Hawaii is having problems with invasive species of plants and animals ruining agriculture, diversity and the natural beauty of the islands.

    Elsewhere, coral reefs are dying as the ocean becomes too acidic – not to mention various “dead zones” all over the place and dwindling populations of fish and deleterious effects on the tip of the food chain (krill, plankton, etc.).

    In short, we’re fucking with the complete wipeout of many species due to our pollution and we either MUST STOP NOW (not next year or in ten years) or we’ll suffer the consequences and there will be no escape for anyone. The collapse has already begun and will ramp up in the coming years due to our FAILURE as the supposed “sentient” species. We may be clever but we certainly aren’t wise.

  • Tom

    Here’s a postcard from Durban to the USA:

    HELL-OOOO!

    http://news.yahoo.com/billion-dollar-weather-disasters-smash-us-record-171523725.html
    “Billion-dollar weather disasters smash US record
    WASHINGTON (AP) — America smashed the record for billion-dollar weather disasters this year with a deadly dozen, and counting.

    With an almost biblical onslaught of twisters, floods, snow, drought, heat and wildfire, the U.S. in 2011 has seen more weather catastrophes that caused at least $1 billion in damage than it did in all of the 1980s, even after the dollar figures from back then are adjusted for inflation.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration added two disasters to the list Wednesday, bringing the total to 12. The two are wildfires in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona and the mid-June tornadoes and severe weather.

    NOAA uses $1 billion as a benchmark for the worst weather disasters.

    Extreme weather in America this year has killed more than 1,000 people, according to National Weather Service Director Jack Hayes. The dozen billion-dollar disasters alone add up to $52 billion.

    The old record for $1 billion disasters was nine, in 2008.

    Hayes, a meteorologist since 1970, said he has never seen a year for extreme weather like this, calling it “the deadly, destructive and relentless 2011.”

    Read the rest.

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