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Jill Stein Speaks As No Democrat Or Republican Will

“We’re talking about breaking up the banks.”

“We’re talking about electoral reform to get the money out of politics so that our votes will not be bought.”

green party candidate 2012“We’re talking about health care as a human right.”

“We’re talking about putting a moratorium on foreclosures.”

“We are calling for bringing the troops home now.”

“I also want to talk about forgiving student debt, because we should be bailing out our students, not the big banks.”

“In our campaign, we are not just talking about environmental justice, and economic justice, and racial justice. We’re also talking about generational justice because young people are getting the short end of the stick on the cost of education, becoming indentured servants.”

Who’s talking, here? It’s certainly not Mitt Romney. You won’t hear Barack Obama talking like this, either. Those big campaign donors on Wall Street don’t like to hear President Hope talking about economic justice.

It’s Jill Stein doing the talking in the quotes you see above, at a meeting with voters this month in Brooklyn, New York. Jill Stein is running for President with the Green Party in 2012, and she’s probably already on the ballot where you live.

Dr. Stein has a lot more to say, too. Check out a sample in a video of her speech there.

Related Links:

- Green Party
- Jill Stein campaign buttons

15 comments to Jill Stein Speaks As No Democrat Or Republican Will

  • Tom

    It might be nice if someone of Dr. Stein’s stature and political bent were to be elected, but it’s statistically unlikely. Besides, as i’ve pointed out before, even if she were elected, she’d still have to “play ball” with the scum already in Congress, the lobbyists, and the military-industrial parasites, not to mention that if she was any good she’d find herself pushing up daisies ala JFK before long (for not going along with the program of corporate dominance/government by and for the wealthy). So i won’t hold my breath.

    After the Obama debacle, i’m so disappointed in politics and completely distrustful of politicians as any kind of solution to our current catastrophic problems (after all they’re the ones who got us into this mess and continue to make it worse by the year) that i won’t vote for any of the clowns in the two major parties (and as my comment above indicates, it’s almost a “wasted vote” to support a third party candidate).

  • Stephen Kent Gray

    “We are calling for bringing the troops home now.”

    That’s the only good thing among them.

    “We’re talking about health care as a human right.”

    On this I’m ambivalent, health care a negative right or as a positive right?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_and_positive_rights

    Also, I vote however I want without regards to pragmatism. Wasted vote: Any vote which is not for an elected candidate. Any vote which does not help to elect a candidate. This means any vote for a losing candidate no matter how viable ie even if the one of the two parties in a two party system, voting for a candidate who wins up losing is a wasted vote. Also, votes over the absolute minimum number of votes for a candidate to win are wasted votes as well. Wasted votes aren’t limited to voting for third parties in a two party system.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasted_vote

    Also, I don’t like conspiracies that much, they aren’t that informative and only further apathize people.

  • NoBushObama

    ITA! I’m tired of a two party system and when you get hooked on a 3rd party candidate that disappoints as much – you just stop trusting in the system. Do you stop fighting? No, but breaks are wonderful.

  • t ball

    She’ll get my vote this year.

  • Charles Manning (manning120)

    Stein is a great candidate. So is Anderson. What I would love to see is a series of debates between them, with one ultimately conceding leadership to the other; maybe a president-vice president situation. Instead, we have Stein running in a whole slew of primaries against people I’ve never heard of, people who almost certainly lack the credentials and qualities of Anderson. And Anderson out there alone. Unless something major and as yet unexpected happens, Greens aren’t going to make a bigger impact nationally in November than they have in the primary season. If candidates like Anderson and Stein end up competing for votes in November, neither will achieve much of anything. I’ve urged this view upon Anderson supporters, and he does remain my favorite, but so far organizing the “left” to enable a powerful, united November alternative hasn’t occurred. Nor have I heard of any such thinking in Stein’s camp. The dolts running as Republicans at least understand that they can’t all be on the ballot, or even two of them, vying for president, if they expect to beat Obama. The great progressive candidates like Stein and Anderson don’t seem to have absorbed that lesson. Am I wrong?

    • Stephen Kent Gray

      Anderson probably won’t be on the ballot in most states. Debates will be useless given that Stein will be on the ballot in way more states than Anderson (except in the extremely unlikely event he is the AE nominee). Anderson won’t be on enough state ballot to be any problem for Stein. I guess that each state will have at least six people running for President on their ballot.

      AE: Buddy Roemer
      C: Robby Wells
      D: Barack Obama
      G: Jill Stein
      L: Gary Johnson
      R: Mitt Romney

      While it’d be best for the left, center, right, up, and down parts of the political spectrum for each to be concentrated in just one candidate for President on the ballot. Due to the strict ballot access laws, this won’t be a problem as most states won’t have any more than the above on the ballot, maybe even less.

      • Charles Manning (manning120)

        Thanks for graphically laying out my point. What a dismal prospect!

        • Stephen Kent Gray

          I was guessing for AE since Buddy Roemer had the most supports for a declared candidate. I listed the parties in alphabetical order. I also guessed for the Constitution Party at random. The other four are the ones I’m pretty sure will receive their nominations, Also, I don’t see why having the sample ballot is dismal.

  • Charles Manning (manning120)

    Because they’re going to split up a potentially substantial percentage of the popular vote. Think how distraught the Republicans would be if they had two major candidates on the ballot. If Romeny won nomination but Santorum stayed in the race through election day, that would probably insure Obama’s re-election. What we need is for enough people to vote for one of our people to at least insure Obama’s defeat. Then progressives would have some influence among the voters after the election. We’re headed for an outcome in which no progressive will be deemed a threat to the major parties (i.e., the parties of the 1%); that is, the same dismal situation we have now. Don’t forget — Stein, Anderson, and some of the others would make much better leaders for our country than any of the Republican or Democratice candidates. As Anderson and Stein (and I’m sure the others) say, the system that so far insures none of the best candidates will win must be changed. But until systemic change can be brought about, intelligent use of what we’ve got has to be the objective.

  • Stephen Kent Gray

    http://politics1.com/p2012.htm

    Charles, look at the list of third party candidates. There are atleast three ex-Republicans running for President if you’re familiar with all the debate snubbed candidates.

    PROHIBITION PARTY:
    Jack Fellure & Rev. Toby Davis
    Lowell “Jack” Fellure (West Virginia) Presidential Nominee
    Toby Davis (Mississippi) Vice Presidential Nominee

    LIBERTARIAN PARTY:
    Gary Johnson (New Mexico) – Ex-Governor and businessman.

    AMERICANS ELECT & REFORM PARTY:
    Buddy Roemer (R-Louisiana) – Former Governor, former Congressman & banker.

    You can break the candidates into these groups:
    Conservatives
    Liberals / Market liberals / Classical liberals / Libertarians / Individualists
    Progressives / Social liberals / Modern liberals
    Social democrats
    Socialists
    Undefined

    Undefined
    Americans Elect
    Reform Party

    Conservatives
    American Independent Party
    America’s Party
    Constitution Party
    Prohibition Party
    Republican Party

    Libertarians
    Boston Tea Party (rescined Tiffany Briscoe as the nominee)
    Libertarian Party
    Objectivist Party
    Twelve Visions Party

    Progressives
    Democratic Party
    Justice Party
    Progressive Party
    Working Families Party

    Social democrats
    Green Party

    Socialists
    Peace & Freedom Party

    While all of the Big Three and American Elect have been on track to gaining 50+DC ballot access, they are doing so at different rates:
    1 Libertarian Party
    2 Green Party
    3 Americans Elect
    4 Constitution Party

    Their candidates will be decided on:
    1 May 4-6, 2012 LNC in Las Vegas Nevada (2 chrono)
    2 July 13-15, 2012 GNC in Baltimore, Maryland (4 chrono)
    3 June 2012 AE over the Internet (3 chrono)
    4 April 18-21, 2012 CNC in Nashville Tennessee (1 chrono)

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