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Health Care Advice From The One Percent

Remedy Magazine is found in pharmacies all across the United States, a free publication chock full of advertisements for prescription medications. There’s more to the magazine than that, of course. Between the advertisements, you sometimes find articles with medical information from highly qualified sources.

When I said “highly qualified sources” just now, I was thinking of the actor, Patrick Dempsey. He’s not a doctor, but he’s played one on TV, so the magazine can show him wearing a white lab coat next to an article entitled, Patrick Dempsey: My 10 Health & Happiness Lessons. In the article, Dempsey shares his “hard won life strategies” for dealing with a loved one’s health crisis.

Dempsey’s first piece of advice: “Try to deal with whatever comes.”

Dempsey’s second piece of advice: Have a sister who is a nurse, so that someone who is in the family can understand what’s going on.

So, we may not be getting very far yet, but you’ll be glad you heard Patrick Dempsey’s third piece of advice for dealing with serious illness: Buy a farm for the sick person. Dempsey acknowledges that, because he was too busy being on TV and in the movies, he couldn’t actually spend time with his mother when she was sick with ovarian cancer. So, instead, he bought her a farm in Maine, because she likes to garden.

Okay, so, if my mother becomes gravely ill, I’ll buy her a farm and tell her to garden several acres of rocky, hardscrabble soil. Enjoy, mom!

Now, where’s that money I set aside to buy an extra house and land in case a family member has a health problem? Is it in my wallet? No. Is it on the bedside table? No. Is it in the kitchen next to the herbs and spices? No. Darn it, where could that money for an extra house and land be?

Oh, that’s right. I don’t have it.

The implication of this article seems to be that the best way to deal with a medical problem is to spend lots and lots of money. Health care is for the One Percent, who can buy a farm. The rest of us, apparently, have already bought the farm.

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