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Complete Americans Elect Mission Report Available for Review

Back in August 2012, the privatized-presidential-election corporation Americans Elect sent out a Mission Report to its large donors, its board of directors, its staff and its advisors. Americans Elect failed to share that report with its own delegates or the American public. Fortunately, Americans Elect advisor David King agreed to slip me his personal copy, and I’ve finished scanning it in. You can read the entire 74-page Americans Elect Mission Report here.

6 comments to Complete Americans Elect Mission Report Available for Review

  • Bill

    This is an important resource, Jim; thanks for slaving over a hot scanner for us. And particular thanks to David King for his willingness to breach the iron curtain.

  • David King

    Hello, all.

    For the record, there’s nothing secret about this report, and I didn’t breach any kind of “iron curtain.” All anyone had to do was ask. AE is a c4, and despite many of the things I’ve read across the Internet, I’ve found the leadership to be open. If there were some hidden agenda, I wasn’t aware of it, despite my close participation in Unity 08 and serving on the advisory board of AE. The thrust of the AE brief — that the parties have hijacked the nominating process, and those parties are essentially private clubs dominated by ideological purists — that brief is right. The AE leadership (and Unity 08 leaders before them) toyed with ways of opening the process up.

    I found Peter Ackerman to be credible and direct. Same with Doug Bailey. And very much true of Kahlil Byrd, Josh Levine, and Governor Whitman. No cabal. Really and truly.

    Yes, there’s money in politics. Campaigns aren’t cheap. The corporate interests at the core of the two parties are corrosive and pervasive. Together, whether through AE or other vehicles, we need to reduce the barriers to ballot access, we need to support election mechanisms that go beyond plurality systems, and we need to find ways to entice the parties to be more representative of a wider range of the electorate.

    For those of you who have not yet read it — take a look at the analysis in Mickey Edwards’ new book. I disagree with many of his suggested reforms, but the analysis is spot on. It’s good for each of us to keep our eyes on the parties, and on AE other organizations. Though let’s also keep working for public votes on things like a “top 3″ primary process, on liberalized ballot access, on state and local PR systems.

    When I read the comments about AE (and I’ve read many many posts), I’m always struck by how similar the concerns are that we shared in Unity 08 and AE. There are huge swaths of overlapping concerns. So, read the AE Mission Report. It’s a public document. The movement — we are all part of a broader “movement” — is crucial.

    David

    • David,

      You were very kind as an individual to share information about Americans Elect. Americans Elect as an institution has not been as transparent as you have been as an individual.

  • Joshua

    I see that “Page 89″ is stamped at the bottom of the first page of the PDF, and the remaining pages are stamped accordingly up to “Page 162″ (page 74 of the PDF).

    Are there another 88 pages that are supposed to precede this report? I would expect that AE would at least have been candid in a post-mortem to its big donors — mentioning things like “many registered users failed to provide voter registration info to qualify as proper delegates,” or “many people claimed that they were unable to complete registration as delegates,” or “we still haven’t revealed how many people did provide their voter registration info and did qualify as delegates,” or “we didn’t get the support-click system available online until three months after we had originally planned to do so,” or “no candidate came close to getting the number of support clicks needed to qualify for our primary, and we thought it would be throwing good money after bad to reduce the support requirements and continue on with this farce.” This report is basically just good news, page after page, with hardly an allusion to AE’s failures.

    From this report, one would think that AE’s track record was nothing but success. Yet not only did they not fail to elect a president, they didn’t even succeed in nominating anybody. It’s like the old saying about “the operation was a success, but the patient died,” except here they’re barely mentioning that the patient died, and they don’t suggest any reasons why the patient died if the operation was so successful.

    The only note of reality that creeps in can be found in the accountant’s report, which points out that “the Organization’s recurring losses from operations, lack of funding and its inability to repay its loans raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern.”

    • Joshua,

      I think there’s an innocent answer to your first question — the reason I was able to figure out to ask Americans Elect Advisor David King for a copy of this document is that it showed up in a course syllabus for one of his Harvard classes. I think those numbers you’re looking at are page numbers for documents in his course pack.

      I agree with you that the Mission Report appears to be a public relations document.

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