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Roll Call: Most Democrats Vote AGAINST Progressive Budget Legislation

If you listened to the Democratic Party and its apologists, you’d believe that the United States of America would be enjoying a progressive economic renewal, if only the Republicans could be voted out of power. If only the Democrats were in charge of the House of Representatives, they say, corporations and millionaires would be paying their fair share of taxes, wages would be fair, education and science would be adequately funded, and Social Security and Medicare would not be at risk.

Yesterday, one vote in the House of Representatives proved this argument to be false.

Yesterday, Representative Raul Grijalva, leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, introduced the Back To Work Budget as an amendment to replace the right wing Republican budget from Paul Ryan. The Progressive Back To Work Caucus would have done the following:

– Restore proper funding to education
– Provide jobs programs to economically distressed communities
– End tax breaks for families with an income over a quarter million dollars per year
– Create a 4% tax increase for millionaires and billionaires
– Make income from investments taxed at the same rate as income from work, rather than at a lower rate
– Dismantle tax incentives that encouraged corporations to move their factories overseas
– Reduce military spending to 2006 levels
– Prevent budget cuts to Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare
– Eliminate subsidies for oil and gas companies
– Established an economic price for carbon pollution

house democrats vote against progressive budgetThis was the sort of budget bill that Democratic voters have spent years waiting for, and so, naturally, most House Democrats voted against it.

There are 200 Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Only 84 of them voted for the progressive Back To Work Budget bill. The majority of House Democrats voted to kill the bill.

Are you represented by a Democrat in the House of Representatives? If so, take a look at the roll call of the Democratic vote yesterday, to see whether your Democratic representative is progressive or anti-progressive:

The 102 Anti-Progressive Democrats in Congress Who Voted Against The Back To Work Budget:

Rep. Ron Barber
Rep. John Barrow
Rep. Ami Bera
Rep. Sanford Bishop
Rep. Timothy Bishop
Rep. Suzanne Bonamici
Rep. Bruce Braley
Rep. Julia Brownley
Rep. Cheri Bustos
Rep. Lois Capps
Rep. John Carney
Rep. Joaquin Castro
Rep. David Cicilline
Rep. Gerald Connolly
Rep. Jim Cooper
Rep. Jim Costa
Rep. Joe Courtney
Rep. Joseph Crowley
Rep. Henry Cuellar
Rep. Susan Davis
Rep. Peter DeFazio
Rep. Diana DeGette
Rep. John Delaney
Rep. Suzan DelBene
Rep. Theodore Deutch
Rep. John Dingell
Rep. Lloyd Doggett
Rep. Tammy Duckworth
Rep. William Enyart
Rep. Elizabeth Esty
Rep. Bill Foster
Rep. Lois Frankel
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
Rep. Pete Gallego
Rep. John Garamendi
Rep. Joe Garcia
Rep. Gene Green
Rep. Colleen Hanabusa
Rep. Denny Heck
Rep. James Himes
Rep. Steven Horsford
Rep. Steny Hoyer
Rep. Steve Israel
Rep. Marcy Kaptur
Rep. William Keating
Rep. Joseph Kennedy
Rep. Daniel Kildee
Rep. Derek Kilmer
Rep. Ron Kind
Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick
Rep. Ann Kuster
Rep. Rick Larsen
Rep. John Larson
Rep. Sander Levin
Rep. David Loebsack
Rep. Zoe Lofgren
Rep. Nita Lowey
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham
Rep. Daniel Maffei
Rep. Sean Maloney
Rep. Jim Matheson
Rep. Doris Matsui
Rep. Carolyn McCarthy
Rep. Mike McIntyre
Rep. Jerry McNerney
Rep. Gregory Meeks
Rep. Michael Michaud
Rep. Patrick Murphy
Rep. Richard Neal
Rep. Beto O’Rourke
Rep. William Owens
Rep. Bill Pascrell
Rep. Nancy Pelosi
Rep. Ed Perlmutter
Rep. Scott Peters
Rep. Gary Peters
Rep. Collin Peterson
Rep. Jared Polis
Rep. Mike Quigley
Rep. Cedric Richmond
Rep. Raul Ruiz
Rep. C. Ruppersberger
Rep. Adam Schiff
Rep. Bradley Schneider
Rep. Kurt Schrader
Rep. Allyson Schwartz
Rep. Robert Scott
Rep. David Scott
Rep. Terri Sewell
Rep. Carol Shea-Porter
Rep. Brad Sherman
Rep. Kyrsten Sinema
Rep. Adam Smith
Rep. Jackie Speier
Rep. Eric Swalwell
Rep. Bennie Thompson
Rep. Dina Titus
Rep. Niki Tsongas
Rep. Chris Van Hollen
Rep. Filemon Vela
Rep. Peter Visclosky
Rep. Timothy Walz

The 84 Progressive Democrats in Congress Who Voted For The Back To Work Budget:

Rep. Robert Andrews
Rep. Karen Bass
Rep. Joyce Beatty
Rep. Xavier Becerra
Rep. Earl Blumenauer
Rep. Robert Brady
Rep. Corrine Brown
Rep. George Butterfield
Rep. Michael Capuano
Rep. Tony Cárdenas
Rep. André Carson
Rep. Matthew Cartwright
Rep. Kathy Castor
Rep. Judy Chu
Rep. Yvette Clarke
Rep. Wm. Clay
Rep. Emanuel Cleaver
Rep. James Clyburn
Rep. Steve Cohen
Rep. John Conyers
Rep. Elijah Cummings
Rep. Danny Davis
Rep. Michael Doyle
Rep. Donna Edwards
Rep. Keith Ellison
Rep. Sam Farr
Rep. Chaka Fattah
Rep. Marcia Fudge
Rep. Alan Grayson
Rep. Al Green
Rep. Raúl Grijalva
Rep. Luis Gutierrez
Rep. Janice Hahn
Rep. Alcee Hastings
Rep. Brian Higgins
Rep. Rush Holt
Rep. Michael Honda
Rep. Jared Huffman
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
Rep. Hakeem Jeffries
Rep. Henry Johnson
Rep. Eddie Johnson
Rep. Barbara Lee
Rep. John Lewis
Rep. Alan Lowenthal
Rep. Ben Luján
Rep. Stephen Lynch
Rep. Carolyn Maloney
Rep. Edward Markey
Rep. Betty McCollum
Rep. Jim McDermott
Rep. James McGovern
Rep. Gwen Moore
Rep. James Moran
Rep. Jerrold Nadler
Rep. Grace Napolitano
Rep. Richard Nolan
Rep. Frank Pallone
Rep. Ed Pastor
Rep. Donald Payne
Rep. Chellie Pingree
Rep. Mark Pocan
Rep. David Price
Rep. Nick Rahall
Rep. Charles Rangel
Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard
Rep. Bobby Rush
Rep. Tim Ryan
Rep. Linda Sánchez
Rep. John Sarbanes
Rep. Janice Schakowsky
Rep. José Serrano
Rep. Albio Sires
Rep. Louise Slaughter
Rep. Mark Takano
Rep. John Tierney
Rep. Paul Tonko
Rep. Juan Vargas
Rep. Marc Veasey
Rep. Nydia Velázquez
Rep. Maxine Waters
Rep. Melvin Watt
Rep. Peter Welch
Rep. John Yarmuth

16 comments to Roll Call: Most Democrats Vote AGAINST Progressive Budget Legislation

  • Linda Ferland

    This goes to show just how many Dems really support the 99%, and have their priorities in order. The remainder are bought-and-paid for poor excuses for the people they represent. DeFazio surprised me. Thought he was better than this!! Tammy Duckworth was another horrible surprise!!!

  • I’m curious but what was the votes for and against from the other party. Also, what’s up with the 7% who didn’t vote?

  • Dave

    My guess is that many in the “against” list have been in Washington long enough to be enriched by their position. They are probably members of the “investment class” themselves, and the one article in the above list of Back to Work items they couldn’t stomach was taxing income from investments at the same rate as income for the working class. Most of the other spending on the list would have been fine by them.

    One question comes to mind though. If a large chunk of the people’s investment money is removed from them through taxation, how many jobs would actually be created by a move like that? Investment money keeps millions on the payroll of small businesses, new start-ups and the like. This clause might be more appropriate for a Back to the Unemployment Line budget bill.

  • jae

    Dove, we have followed that trickle down theory for years, and it has NOT led to more jobs. The government jobs that have been cut through sequestration austerity, and would be restored by this bill, are very real.

    I choose real jobs over theoretical jobs.

    • JeffD

      jae, I think you might be mistaken. Dry up investments and forget building, construction and even payroll. Very few businesses operate on a cash only basis. Investments are a huge economic driver. It’s not a trickle down, it’s just about the entire flow.

      • jae

        That’s THEORY. I’m talking about reality. You can’t show me that, in reality, when taxes for the investor class were lowered, jobs were created.

        I can show that, in reality, the across-the-board slashing of government spending is causing large numbers of job losses.

        You choose theory, Jeff. I choose reality.

        • Dave

          jae – I have borrowed money from investors to purchase one small business and start up another. Both were successful in their day and I was able to hire a number of young people over the years at wages well above minimum wage. Those who invested in these enterprises made a modest return for the risk they took with their money which came mostly from their savings. Nothing trickled down to anybody, everyone had a part to play and I was able to create employment for myself and others where before there was none. That is how things work.

          If you want to wait for trickle-down patronage from Washington, remember that the money they spend to “create” jobs was taken from free people doing cool stuff that bureaucrats wished they had thought of themselves.

        • JeffD

          jae, You’re confusing reality with rhetoric. Dave responded with a small example of reality which is the way this works throughout the economy across the country.

          • jae

            Dave responded with a piece of unsubstantiated theory. Reality is that large numbers of people have lost jobs due to the sequester’s federal budget cuts, and that more job cuts are on the way. You can’t back up Dave’s theoretical assertion with facts either.

        • JeffD

          jae, Dave responded with his real life example. If you want substantiation talk to any local business or bank you like about how investments work in their business. If you want to continue to live in the world of rhetoric, don’t.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factions_in_the_Democratic_Party_%28United_States%29
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Party_%28United_States%29

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factions_in_the_Republican_Party_%28United_States%29
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republican_Party_%28United_States%29

    What are the ideological makeup of each district listed above? How many people are social democrats (vote Democratic Party, but best represented by Green Party ), progressives (vote Democratic Party, but best represented by Justice Party), libertarians (vote Republican Party, but best represented by Libertarian Party), conservatives (vote Republican Party, but best represented by Constitution Party), or whatever else in those districts?

    Also, I live in Indiana’s 1st so, my Representative is one of the no voters. Rep. Peter Visclosky is my Congressman, though I did vote for Joel Phelps (Republican) in the last election. I did vote for Jon Morris (Libertarian) back in 2010.

  • Anon

    Couldn’t find this information anywhere else, great summary. For every four articles about Paul Ryan’s budget, maybe one about the Progressive Caucus as an afterthought. The budgets are still great talking points. The views of the people will prick their consciences as they debate the 2014 budge endlessly. At least we’ll know what could have been. Thanks.

  • Tom C

    My freshman representative Bill Enyart is on that list along with Tammy Duckworth and Patrick Murphy. It’s a shame that I gave them money for the campaign last year. But maybe they can still be brought around.

  • Sharon

    Perhaps, with that number of Democrats voting against this bill, you should reassess your assumption of what ‘most’ Democrats want. Perhaps, they represent the people much more closely than you do.

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