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Barn Door

Don’t worry. The horse isn’t the only thing that’s out of the barn.

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8 thoughts on “Barn Door”

  1. Bill says:

    Beautiful, Rowan. Can you ID some of the plants for us?

    1. Rowan says:

      The plant hanging over the doorway is a climbing hydrangea. They take a while to get started, but once they go, they’re powerful. In the background are a tall grass and a lilac. What you can’t see, given this angle meant to catch the sun, is a large red japanese maple

      1. Bill says:

        I didn’t know there was such a thing as a climbing hydrangea. Cool!

        1. Rowan says:

          Yes, and much, much bigger than any standard hydrangea you’ll see. Mine goes 16 feet up the barn

  2. Tom says:

    The tree on the left isn’t fully leafed out – like many i’ve seen this spring (and now evident in summer). Trees are under a lot of stress from air pollution, and becoming more susceptible, from the warming climate and aberrant weather, to bugs and disease (also due to climate change). Many are rotting from the inside and there are lots of external signs indicating tree ill health, besides the failure to leaf out fully, like spotted leaves, dropping leaves early, loose bark, dead branches, thin crowns and holes, cankers, oozing, etc. Climate change is out of the barn and it’s wreaking havoc.

    It is a lovely shot though, i agree. Enjoy it while you still have it.

    1. Rowan says:

      To be fair, Tom, the tree on the left is actually an big old walnut tree. They are the last of the trees to leaf out around here, and so they’re fairly thin right now, but will provide lush shade within a week or two.

  3. Tom says:

    i hope so. i’m watching the steady decline of most of the trees in my locale and on my daily journey to and from school. Especially the pines – they’re really starting to look ‘scraggly.’ It’s all a result of air pollution, especially tropospheric ozone. You live in a beautiful area. Appreciate it.

    1. Rowan says:

      The pines scraggliness (is that a word?) may also be a result of a pine borer. I’ve seen places in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania where all the pines have gone suddenly, simply dead.

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