Enter your email address to subscribe to Irregular Times and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 448 other subscribers

Irregular Times Newsletters

Click here to subscribe to any or all of our six topical e-mail newsletters:
  1. Social Movement Actions,
  2. Credulity and Faith,
  3. Election News,
  4. This Week in Congress,
  5. Tech Dispatch and
  6. our latest Political Stickers and Such

Contact Us

We can be contacted via retorts@irregulartimes.com

Roll Call: Who In Congress Voted To Keep The NSA Spying On American Phone Calls?

The opening phrase of the Los Angeles Times article reporting on today’s vote in the U.S. House of Representatives to block reform of the National Security Agency’s military surveillance of Americans’ telephone calls aptly represents the crisis in American politics reflected by the government’s spying. The vote came, the LA Times says, “after furious lobbying by the Obama administration and Republican leaders…”

nsa surveillance scandalDid Democratic Party members vote in 2008 and 2012 because they thought that Barack Obama would work with the Republican Party to prevent reform of George W. Bush’s unconstitutional electronic surveillance systems? President Obama seems to think so. He’s using his political capital, not to end or reform George W. Bush’s attacks on Americans’ constitutional right to protection from unreasonable search and seizure, but to prolong and extend those attacks.

U.S. Representative Justin Amash led a bipartisan coalition in the House of Representatives in an attempt to reform the NSA system of military spying on Americans’ telephone calls. The Amash amendment would have simply brought the NSA program back into accord with the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, requiring that the government identify the specific individuals it is targeting before it seizes private telephone records. Under the current NSA telephone surveillance system, the military spy agency does not identify any particular target for spying – it just spies on every American who is using a telephone.

Any member of Congress who voted against the Amash amendment would be voting against the Bill of Rights. So, naturally, the House defeated the Amash amendment.

The American people deserve to know which members of Congress voted to allow the President to continue a vast surveillance system that violates Americans’ constitutional rights, spying on Americans’ private activities on a daily basis. We’re naming names, and not for the sake of giving any political party an electoral advantage in 2014, because both Republicans and Democrats are on this list of shame:

The 83 Democrats who voted to keep the Big Brother military surveillance system targeted against Americans:

Robert Andrews
Ron Barber
John Barrow
Ami Bera
Sanford Bishop
Timothy Bishop
Corrine Brown
Julia Brownley
George Butterfield
John Carney
Kathy Castor
Joaquin Castro
Jim Cooper
Jim Costa
Henry Cuellar
Susan Davis
John Delaney
Tammy Duckworth
Eliot Engel
William Enyart
Elizabeth Esty
Bill Foster
Lois Frankel
Pete Gallego
Joe Garcia
Al Green
Luis Gutierrez
Colleen Hanabusa
Denny Heck
Brian Higgins
James Himes
Rubén Hinojosa
Steny Hoyer
Steve Israel
Sheila Jackson Lee
Henry Johnson
Eddie Johnson
Marcy Kaptur
Joseph Kennedy
Derek Kilmer
Ron Kind
Ann Kirkpatrick
Ann Kuster
James Langevin
Rick Larsen
Sander Levin
Daniel Lipinski
Nita Lowey
Sean Maloney
Jim Matheson
Mike McIntyre
Jerry McNerney
Gregory Meeks
Grace Meng
Patrick Murphy
Donald Payne
Nancy Pelosi
Scott Peters
Gary Peters
Collin Peterson
David Price
Mike Quigley
Raul Ruiz
C. Ruppersberger
Tim Ryan
Janice Schakowsky
Bradley Schneider
Allyson Schwartz
David Scott
Terri Sewell
Kyrsten Sinema
Albio Sires
Louise Slaughter
Adam Smith
Mike Thompson
Dina Titus
Chris Van Hollen
Juan Vargas
Marc Veasey
Peter Visclosky
Debbie Wasserman Schultz
Frederica Wilson

The 134 Republicans who voted to keep the Big Brother military surveillance system targeted against Americans:

Robert Aderholt
Rodney Alexander
Michele Bachmann
Garland Barr
Dan Benishek
Gus Bilirakis
John Boehner
Jo Bonner
Charles Boustany
Kevin Brady
Mo Brooks
Susan Brooks
Larry Bucshon
Ken Calvert
Dave Camp
Eric Cantor
Shelley Capito
John Carter
Tom Cole
Doug Collins
Chris Collins
K. Conaway
Paul Cook
Tom Cotton
Eric Crawford
Ander Crenshaw
John Culberson
Jeff Denham
Charles Dent
Mario Diaz-Balart
Renee Ellmers
Bill Flores
J. Forbes
Jeff Fortenberry
Virginia Foxx
Trent Franks
Rodney Frelinghuysen
Jim Gerlach
Bob Gibbs
Phil Gingrey
Bob Goodlatte
Kay Granger
Sam Graves
Michael Grimm
Brett Guthrie
Richard Hanna
Gregg Harper
Vicky Hartzler
Doc Hastings
Joseph Heck
Jeb Hensarling
George Holding
Richard Hudson
Duncan Hunter
Robert Hurt
Darrell Issa
Sam Johnson
David Joyce
Mike Kelly
Steve King
Peter King
Adam Kinzinger
John Kline
Leonard Lance
James Lankford
Tom Latham
Robert Latta
Frank LoBiondo
Billy Long
Frank Lucas
Blaine Luetkemeyer
Tom Marino
Kevin McCarthy
Michael McCaul
Howard McKeon
David McKinley
Patrick Meehan
Luke Messer
Jeff Miller
Candice Miller
Tim Murphy
Randy Neugebauer
Kristi Noem
Devin Nunes
Alan Nunnelee
Pete Olson
Steven Palazzo
Erik Paulsen
Robert Pittenger
Joseph Pitts
Mike Pompeo
Tom Reed
David Reichert
James Renacci
E. Rigell
Martha Roby
Mike Rogers
Harold Rogers
Mike Rogers
Thomas Rooney
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen
Peter Roskam
Edward Royce
Jon Runyan
Paul Ryan
Austin Scott
Pete Sessions
John Shimkus
Bill Shuster
Michael Simpson
Adrian Smith
Lamar Smith
Steve Stivers
Marlin Stutzman
Lee Terry
Mac Thornberry
Patrick Tiberi
Michael Turner
Fred Upton
David Valadao
Ann Wagner
Tim Walberg
Greg Walden
Jackie Walorski
Daniel Webster
Brad Wenstrup
Lynn Westmoreland
Ed Whitfield
Robert Wittman
Frank Wolf
Steve Womack
Rob Woodall
C. Young
Todd Young

1 comment to Roll Call: Who In Congress Voted To Keep The NSA Spying On American Phone Calls?

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>