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CNet Kicks Off Professional Media Coverage of Oct. 26 March Against Surveillance

Dara Kerr of CNet is the first reporter I’m aware of to provide coverage to tomorrow’s rally and march in Washington, DC against unconstitutional bulk surveillance of hundreds of millions of Americans’ activities, communications, whereabouts and associations. Kerr interviews Rainey Reitman, one of the primary organizers of the protest through his role at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

In that interview, Reitman gets very specific about what the march is organized for. This is no let’s-figure-out-our-demands-later Occupy lifestyle movement:

We ask for three things in particular. First, we are asking for a congressional investigation so we can shed light on exactly what the National Security Agency is doing. Secondly, we ask for reform of federal surveillance law, specifically Section 215 of the Patriot Act, section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and the state secrets privilege. The third thing we ask for is that the public officials who are responsible for hiding this be held accountable for their actions.

Reitman gets smart about his message, too. Any social movement should have some kind of appeal to your mom:

Q: How important is surveillance law reform to the everyday American?

A: This type of dragnet surveillance affects everybody. It affects you and me, and it’s keeping records of every time I call my mother. It’s the type of information that frankly the federal government doesn’t need to be collecting on every single person in the United States. It has a real palpable effect on the ability of Americans to communicate in privacy.

Read more at CNet, and get ready (I hope) for a big day tomorrow.

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