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A Corkboard Candidacy

bernieforpresident.jpgU.S. Senator Bernard Sanders is considered a possible candidate for President in 2016, but months have passed since his name was proposed by liberal activists, and still we don’t know what Sanders means to do. He hasn’t agreed to run, but he has pointedly refused to say he won’t run, either.

How much support would a Sanders for President campaign enjoy? There are no nationwide polls that address this question, but I came across one important sign of genuine grassroots enthusiasm this afternoon. The individually printed picture of Sanders that you see here, with a hand-written message framing it, was posted just this week in on a corkboard at a neighborhood grocery store in my village.

In a little town of just 1,500 people, there’s at least one other person agitating for a Sanders candidacy. A network of similar people across the country just might get something started. Stay tuned for news on a bulletin board near you.

1 comment to A Corkboard Candidacy

  • Charles Manning

    One of the biggest obstacles Sanders faces is ballot access. Recently I was notified through the Texas Bar Association (of all people) that the Green Party has ballot access in Texas, the famous conservative backwater allegedly overrun by the likes of Ted Cruz. Check it out at txgreens@txgreens.org. Sanders could sign up as a candidate with the Green Party and be guaranteed a spot on the Texas presidential ballot in 2016. In Texas, a candidate for the state supreme court outpolled Jill Stein by hundreds of thousands of votes in 2012. Why shouldn’t or wouldn’t Sanders proceed under the Green Party label? I’ve already told them that I’ll be available for whatever office they think is appropriate, but haven’t heard back. Any ideological differences with the Greens pale in significance when you consider the obstacles to ballot access. What do you think?

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