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Better The Chopping Block Than The Firing Squad For American Soldiers

Yesterday, South Carolina Congressman Joe Wilson angrily denounced a proposal to reduce the number of soldiers in the military, saying that the decision “threatens national security.” Representative Wilson seems to have forgotten that not one soldier among the huge number employed by the U.S. military on September 11, 2011 were able to do a thing to stop the big terrorist attacks that day. It isn’t a large number of soldiers that will make us secure.

Wilson complained that the reduction in the size of the military would place soldiers “on the chopping block,” but Wilson showed no consideration on the welfare of those same soldier’s when he sent them into harm’s way in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

We ought to have strong government programs to provide employment for people who need it, but there’s no reason that a government employment system needs to focus on teaching young Americans to fight and kill – job skills that are not easily transferable.

1 comment to Better The Chopping Block Than The Firing Squad For American Soldiers

  • Dave

    This piqued my interest. Looked up active military by state, and S. Carolina (Joe Wilson’s State) has 11,000 in the Army. Comparable States in population such as Minnesota and Oregon have 1300 and 850 respectively. It might be said that this Congressman is just doing his job, trying to put the brakes on a reduction of Federal payroll in his district. It is likely that in the tarpaper shacks and pine barrens of S. Carolina there is not the job base that could pay for feeding, clothing, housing and educating this many poor people otherwise, as agrarian states don’t have the infrastructure and capital investment that it would take. Perhaps the concentration of Army personnel reflects the Army bases there, I dunno, but it’s still payroll for S. Carolina.

    The Feds will reduce Army jobs and then “create” new job for these folks, I suppose.

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