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The Scripps Institution Of

It is a wise scholar who allows the natural rhythms of the subject being studied to inform the way in which research is conducted. So it is with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which, as the ocean has apparently decided, should from now on simply be referred to as the Scripps Institution of.

oceanography

I’m wondering, though, exactly who at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography thought that it would be a good idea to post a sign for the organization precisely where oceanography predicts that forces of deposition may occur.

2 comments to The Scripps Institution Of

  • Tom

    That’s a good one Green Man – reminds me of the pic where the words “I don’t believe in climate change” are partially submerged in water. It looks like from here on out institutions like this and the entire field of oceanography will be dealing with pollution, species die-off and acidification (while they’re measuring how quickly sea level rise is occurring). They can now add radiation measurements to their list, since it isn’t slowing down or stopping (from Fukushima mainly).

    Must have been fun while it lasted.

  • Tom

    Sorry for posting this here, Green Man – I don’t know where else to put it (besides “where the sun don’t shine”). I’ve been told in no uncertain terms that chemical spraying of the atmosphere was pure fiction and that anyone who believes any of the so-called evidence is a conspiracy theorist loon. Well, the evidence keeps mounting and now it’s even mainstream:

    http://dutchsinse.tatoott1009.com/6122014-multiple-drones-being-tested-for-weather-modification-spraying/

    6/12/2014 — Multiple DRONES being tested for Weather Modification Spraying

    Now, June 2014, we see another story appear in the main stream media regarding Drones and Weather Modification.

    Now being reported as experiments being done at SIX sites.. one of which is in Nevada.

    The other 5 sites are: New York, Virginia, Texas, Alaska, and North Dakota.

    Thanks to Ginger Wagner for sharing this story below.

    ——————————————————————————–

    http://www.accuweather.com/en/features/trend/drones-weather-modification/28257378

    “Cloud seeding may be the next frontier for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), more commonly known as drones, with potential global implications.

    The state of Nevada was one of six selected test sites by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in December 2013. One of the state’s focuses is how UAS can make cloud seeding an easier, more economical process.

    Cloud seeding is the attempt to modify the amount of precipitation from clouds, done mostly in an attempt to alleviate drought by creating precipitation. Presently it is done by launching silver iodide into the clouds from the ground or by flying over top of the clouds and dropping the chemicals into the cloud formations.

    There is still necessary research to be done before cloud seeding can be proven as an effective tool according to AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Jesse Ferrell.

    “It’s hard to prove if it works or not because we don’t know what would happen if we hadn’t seeded,” he said. Still, he sees how drones could assist the technology once more concrete evidence is gathered.

    Cloud seeding is a more common practice internationally than within the United States. China is known to use the technique frequently. The Nevada government is hoping to break into the global weather modification market by working with this new technology.

    Director of Weather Modification Activities at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada, Jeff Tilley said that using drones for cloud seeding will offer a more cost-effective alternative to the controversial process.

    Ground-based cloud seeding and manned airborne aircraft seeding are the two procedures currently used. While ground-based is the more common approach, it does not provide as much reach as the more expensive airborne. UAS could bridge the gap between the two and offer an alternative that is inexpensive, yet covers more area.

    Fuel is one of the factors that drives up the price of airborne seeding and Tilley sees that as the area where the UAS could provide the most difference.

    [there’s more, including video]

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