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Rather Than Answer a Question about the Matthew 4 Protocol, Mark Stengler Hits the Delete Key

On February 15 2014, I shared an offer sent to me by GOP USA and a company called Health Revelations using the name of “Dr. Mark Stengler” to lend an authoritative voice that a “Bible Code” called the “Matthew 4 Protocol.” I shared with you ten indications that the so-called Matthew 4 Protocol is actually a scam. At the same time, I wondered if perhaps Mark Stengler might by a victim in the apparent scam, with his name being appropriated by someone else to lend an air of authority (although it wouldn’t be the authority of a real, full medical doctor: Mark Stengler got his doctorate in a “naturopathic” school unaccredited by any actual major medical institution). Could Stengler be a victim? After all, I noticed, there was no claim about any Matthew 4 Protocol cancer cure on the Mark Stengler website markstengler.com:

If “Dr. Mark Stengler” is really involved in the discovery and sale of this amazing “cure,” why wouldn’t he be trumpeting the fact to the hills, or at least modestly mentioning his accomplishment somewhere on his highly promotional website?

On the morning of March 1, I decided to follow all the directions provided to me in order to receive full information on the Matthew 4 Protocol for “free.” It’s the evening of March 11 now, and in the 11 days since I signed up, I have not received a single shred of information telling me what this miraculous Matthew 4 Cancer Protocol is. That’s a promise broken. Instead, I’ve been sent a new pitch telling me that I have to pay $19 for the supposed miracle cure… and a whole lot of spam hawking other fake “cures.”

With both the first pitch and the second pitch claiming that Mark Stengler vouches for the “Matthew 4 Protocol” as a cancer cure-all, I wanted to be absolutely sure that Mark Stengler had a chance to clear his name. Perhaps, even though these messages used his name to endorse this mysterious super-cancer-fix-all (mine for free just $19), he was just a victim who didn’t know anything about it. Maybe someone had stolen the Mark Stengler identity, I thought.

So I went to Mark Stengler’s business page on Facebook, where people were already asking him if this was some kind of “internet scam.” Mark Stengler didn’t answer their questions straight on, but did tell people that this was connected to the business that distributed his newsletter. This means that he is connected, at least indirectly, to the Matthew 4 Protocol claims.

On March 9, I posted questions to Mark Stenger over Twitter and on his Facebook business page:

Facebook message from Irregular Times: Dr. Stengler, a web page and an e-mail message suggest that you have

By March 10, additional comments, angrier than mine, had been posted to Mark Stengler’s business page on Facebook, seconding my questions and demanding that they be answered.

Today, Mark Stengler’s business page on Facebook was temporarily withdrawn from the web. When it came back online, can you guess what happened next?

That’s right. My simple, absolutely fair question to Mark Stengler was deleted, along with all the follow-up comments posted by others.

Why, if Mark Stengler had actually discovered a miracle cancer cure that prevents any cancer from surviving in the body, would he delete a question asking if he were responsible for the miracle discovery?

On the other hand, if Mark Stengler were completely unconnected to the scam promotion, why would he delete the question asking him about the issue? Wouldn’t he want to clear things up?

I encourage you to visit facebook.com/markstengler and ask Mark Stengler what’s up. Either he’ll respond to you… or he’ll delete your question.

I suggest that you use the ever-handy “print screen” function on your computer when you do so. There’s nothing like a visual record to keep a pertinent question from being shoved down the memory hole:

Why did Mark Stengler delete this simple question from his Facebook business page?  Ask Mark Stengler -- and hope he doesn't delete your message.

2 comments to Rather Than Answer a Question about the Matthew 4 Protocol, Mark Stengler Hits the Delete Key

  • I have had better relations with naturopaths. Perhaps contact his professional organisation.

  • Kenneth Wade Wilson

    The Matthew 4 protocol, fasting for forty days in the wilderness until you have some kind of spiritual experience (Jesus met Satan or was tempted by his own uncertainty as to how he should devote his life, be it to politics or to the spiritual), is a purgative as well as an exhilarating process. The body, cannibalizing itself for lack of food, becomes aroused, clearer minded, more alert in many ways, undistracted by a busy digestive system and driven by its need to hunt, a need that can be turned inward in contemplation with amazing results.
    Doing this regularly, not necessarily for forty days at a time (you could die), is a way of optimizing your body’s abilities, including the immunological. I take an immune booster instead. I have achieved an overall IQ increase losing a hundred pounds; I’m down to 240 from 335 in three years.
    Since cancer is a fooled immune system, among things, then a way of eliminating the pathogens fooling the immune system is important. Fasting might achieve that, and exposure to the sun.
    I like Stengler’s remark I’ve read lately, that in some areas medical people have it wrong half the time. I may add to this that medical people eschew cross disciplinary research, such as the exploitation of quantum mechanics by the brain and its remarkable ability to remember the future as well as the past, plus other people’s memories and places it’s never been.
    If there’s not enough research on the Matthew protocol, then we must, to be fair, add that there’s not enough research in conventional medicine either. I’ve known doctors who were criminals, hospitals with dog cages and incinerators for disposing not just of aborted foetuses but full sized children; it was done to me once, but I befriended the dog, or the voice in my head did. Who was that voice? A crank would say Jesus. The voice said it was my angel, my protector.
    The mind and body are far more sophisticated than current understanding in medicine or naturopathy. I’ve taken some of Stengler’s pills and they do envigorate. Some other things I take reduce my mouthsores and magnify my mind as well as fasting.
    IF you don’t like Stengler, then dislike him for scientific reasons. Study the effects of his pills and decide for youself. Don’t be a parrot. Quacks and antiquacks are parrots, a dime a dozen. If you can’t detect them yourself, you’re a dying soul.

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