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Will There Be a Terrorist Attack At Moogfest?

Today sees the beginning of Moogfest down in Ashville, North Carolina. It’s a multi-day event that synthesizes the intersection of technology and art.

Moogfest sounds like a lot of fun. Yet, according to one conspiracy theorist, the festival could become a bloodbath.

David Chase Taylor, who writes under the pseudonym “Truther”, warns that “there is now the possibility that terror-related event like a gun-related massacre may occur” at Moogfest.

moogfest terrorism conspiracy theory

What’s the basis for Taylor’s prediction? Governor Pat McCrory has canceled his appearance at Moogfest. Taylor suggests that it’s reasonable to conclude that Governor McCrory has decided not to go to Moogfest because McCrory is part of an international conspiracy involving Barack Obama to create a civil war in the United States through a purposefully planned attack by gunmen who are set up to falsely appear as foreign terrorists. It’s a false flag attack against Moogfest that’s coming, says Taylor…

…or not. Taylor places the following disclaimer on the bottom of his article: “Terror alerts and warnings made by Truther.org DO NOT necessarily imply that these terror events will transpire in reality.”

Really? How does it not imply that a terrorist attack will transpire in reality when Taylor writes, “It’s possible that McCrory’s timely ‘scheduling conflict’ was executed in order to draw unprecedented media attention to Moogfest as well as imply that he is ‘in the know’ about a future attack. Since the Obama administration is desperately trying to spark a civil war in America, nothing would do more for this cause than a Southern governor who was as accessory to a false-flag massacre in which hundreds of North Carolina teens were killed.”?

David Chase Taylor is clearly implying that he believes that the Governor of North Carolina and the President of the United States are planning to murder large numbers of Americans in order to provoke a civil war. It’s ridiculous for Taylor to claim otherwise.

But then, it’s not a surprise for Taylor to make a ridiculous claim. The logic underlying his claims about Pat McCrory and Barack Obama’s supposed false flag operation represents a mind willing to indulge in wild fantasies of ever-present conspiracies.

Taylor’s argument is based upon the presumption that whenever a political leader cancels an appointment, it is because the leader is helping to arrange a terrorist attack against his or her constituents. According to this logic, when some British Columbia schools canceled recess recently, it must have been because school leaders were planning to go on a shooting spree on the playground. According to this logic, when the Liverpool city council canceled the presentation of an independent report, it’s a sign that the council is part of a plot to gun down the local government. According to this logic, when Miley Cyrus canceled some concerts, it’s probably because she knows about a terrorist plan to bomb the stadiums where she was scheduled to sing.

This logic may seem weird, but David Chase Taylor has found a way to stitch the gaping hole in his thinking tight shut. He claims that any time he predicts a terrorist attack, he is simultaneously preventing the terrorist attack from taking place. Taylor believes that terrorists around the world, and the American political leaders they work for, stamp their feet in frustration whenever he publishes a blog article describing a tenuous thread between them and murderous atrocities in the future. “Historically speaking, once a false-flag terror plot is exposed (e.g., 2011 Super Bowl Nuclear Terror Plot), it is immediately canceled or postponed,” he writes.

By this reasoning, when Taylor’s predictions don’t come true, it’s a sign that the predictions were accurate, and that Taylor is a super-powerful writer who has the unique ability to stop the conspiracies that he describes merely by writing about them. How could you ever prove such an argument wrong?

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