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John Hagee Speaks: Apparently, Shame isn’t Biblical

You’re Pastor John Hagee. You’ve just spent over a year shooting video after video making prophecies . You’ve been making big profits selling over a million of your CDs and DVDs and Books declaring that by the lunar eclipse of September 27, 2015 “Something is

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Mad Science You Can’t Do At Home

This year, I have taken on the responsibility of giving my 13 year-old son some exposure to science in addition to what he gets at school. So, I was excited when I saw a copy of Mad Science: Experiments You Can Do At Home –

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A Book Of Zoology

I was upset when I saw this afternoon that my children had taken a favorite book about 20 allergy from my own childhood and takend it into the woods, where it was forgotten, left to molder. But then, as I stooped to see a slug

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The Culture Of Academic Book Covers

I have never understood why so many academic books have abstract, irrelevant pieces of artwork on their covers, when it would not be difficult to add a photograph or sketch related to the topic of the book. This book, for example – The Cultures Of

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Review: Independents Rising by Jacqueline Salit

On the first page of the new book Independents Rising, author Jacqueline Salit offers a fair warning: the book is “based on my personal experiences, rather than dictated by a single illuminating and unifying idea.” Independents Rising is not a book about ideas or even

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A More Subtle Ragnarok

Part of Byatt’s use of Ragnarok is as an ecological warning of the human destruction of life on Earth. That’s all well and good, but this ecological interpretation seems itself to be a metaphor for a deeper, more honest mourning of the open fields of childhood, and its relevance to the eventual devolution of the pure and beautiful into a black inky nothingness.

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God Is Not God

The word that Karen Armstrong translates as “God” is actually a phrase: “ho theos” (in Greek lettering, of course). “Ho theos” is translated into English not as the name of a deity, but as a referral to the realm of deity in general or as a reference to one particular deity without naming that deity. In Metaphysics, Aristotle argues for “ho theos” as an impersonal cosmic source of creation. Aristotle’s use of the term “ho theos” does not refer to Yahweh, the prime deity of the Jews.

Psst... what kind of person doesn't support pacifism?